Sunday, January 18, 2009

Carrington Card Co. of Chicago, Illinois


If it's not Sticking My Neck Out Too Far - Will You be my Valentine?

6 1/4" x 8"
circa 1930s, 1940s
Standing Flat with 3-D Feature
made in USA
by Carrington
'E' in tree logo

For you my Valentine.

3 1/4" x 5"
circa 1920s, 1930s 
Flat with Easel Stand
by Carrington
'C' in tree logo
marked: made in Saxony

The George S. Carrington Company was in business by at least 1917. They appear listed as an exhibitor at a convention for  the drug store industry in American Druggist and Pharmaceutical Record Vol 65 Jan-Dec 1917. They published books and games as well as cards. The address for the company noted on their game boxes circa 1950s is 2740 West Fullerton Ave in Chicago, Illinois. In American Stationer Vol 86 of May 8, 1920 their address is listed as 2330 W Van Buren, Chicago, Ill.

Hope I WIND UP as your valentine!

3" x 5 1/2"
dated 1947
Flat
made in USA
Carrington
'A' in tree logo


Their cards are marked with a logo in the shape of a tree outline containing a letter (usually A, H, C, or E) inside the tree. Some early cards are marked with an 'H' inside a circle. The letter code in the tree may be an indication of the price, with different prices being indicated by different letters, but this is not known for certain.


To My Valentine - Roses for remembrance Would bring into your mind My glad and happy wishes For you, dear Valentine.

6" x 7 3/4"
circa 1910s, 1920s
Flat
marked: 'H' in circle 6003
made in USA
by Carrington

In 1937, the company made the headlines when retired president Charles Sherman Ross was kidnapped, held for ransom, then killed along with one of the kidnappers, James Atwood Gray (perhaps to avoid splitting any ransom they hoped to receive). Murderer John Seadlund was the subject of an FBI manhunt and finally captured in early 1938 at the Santa Anita Race Track in Arcadia, California.

It was love at first glance When I saw you ~ Say! How do you feel about me? I'd like you for my valentine!

4" x 5" (5" x 8" opened)
1930s
French fold
made in USA
by Carrington
'A' in tree logo

Wartime shortages led to the demise of the George C Whitney Co of Worchester, Massachusetts. Immediately following the war proved to be a difficult time for many in the card making industry with even the most successful companies like Raphael Tuck suffering due to pressures from the war such as paper shortages around the same time.  Carrington bought out Whitney in 1942, purchasing presses, stock and more. They continued on, creating desirable cards until 1955, when they too closed down. Tuck managed to hang on a little longer, shuttering their doors after 1959.

Oh! that I could learn the art Of dancing right into your heart.

2 3/4" x 5 1/4"
circa 1920s, 1930s
Flapper figure with headband, bobbed hair and star-shaped beauty mark under her eye
Mechanical Flat
made in USA
by Carrington
marked: 'C' in circle 'H' in circle 6002
'C' in tree logo on the back

We have cards by Carrington in many of our other categories. Enter 'Carrington' into the search box in the upper left to see them all. 

You've got me CORNERED My love ~ Here I sit a-dreamin 'bout you, Sort 'o lonesome, kind o' blue, Thinkin' I can't do without you - Be My Valentine, please do.

3 1/2" x 5 5/8" flat
circa 1930s
Part of a series of corner-sitting cards
Fold Out
by Carrington
'A' in tree logo
 


This valentine is twined around
With hopes that gladness will be found
Within the happy heart of you
On this day and on all days too.

4" x 4 7/8"
circa 1920s/1930s
Flat

made by Carrington Co



Life would be divine. If would be my Valentine.

3 1/4" x 5"
circa 1920s/1930s
made by Carrington
'C' in tree logo
also has older mark of an 'H' in a circle in lower right
marked: 6002


I can only manage Two Hearts Yours and Mine.

3 3/4" x 4 1/4"
dated 1933
Mechanical Flat with Easel Stand
marked: Carrington (with 'C' in tree logo)

I think the world and all of you - Dear Valentine.

3" x 2 3/4"
circa 1920s
Flat
made by Carrington
in the USA
'A' in tree logo



To My Valentine ~ Tell me with those eyes of thine That you will be My Valentine.

2 1/4" x 2 3/4" (4 1/2 x 2 3/4" opened)
circa 1910s, 1920s 
Single Fold
 By Carrington
 Marked with 'H' in circle logo followed with 6001
 made in USA 



Valentine Greetings ~ Sweet and old fashioned Loving and true Such is the heart I am offering to you.  

4 1/2" x 5 1/2" (9" x 5 1/2" opened)
circa 1920s, 1930s
French Fold
by Carrington
 'E' in tree logo



For My Valentine.

5 1/4" x 9"
circa 1920s, 1930s 
 Mechanical Flat with Easel Stand
 by Carrington
 'G' in tree logo

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Artists known to have worked for Carrington:

  • Jessie Louise Taylor

11 comments:

  1. I have been collecting Carrington Cards for about a year and are in love with them.
    Beautiful color and style give them a draw that will not let me put them down when looking at them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, me too! Where have you found them? online or malls? Just curious...

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    2. The first cards I started buying back in the late 1980s and early 1990s were from yard sales and vintage shops. Now I buy cards at local auctions, antique shops and malls, flea markets, on Ebay and Etsy, and from visitors to my little museum. Ebay has become one of the best places to find (and sell) cards, with lots available all year round. There are always more cards on Ebay that I would like to purchase, than I could ever possibly afford.

      Delete
  2. Do you know any ways of displaying older valentines cards? I have been collecting them for about a year, and they are just starting to pile up around the house.
    thanks

    ReplyDelete
  3. You could put some in frames or shadow boxes to hang them on the wall. I place some of the standing ones on display shelves sometimes. I don't leave them set up like that for too long though as I wouldn't want to allow the cards to collect dust. I use acid-free photo albums and boxes to keep them in. The albums allow them to be shared easily (as people can flip through the book to admire them) without risk of the cards becoming damaged.

    Thank you for stopping by the Valentine Museum!

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  4. I bought a valentine that I thought was made by carrington. When I got it though it had made in usa surrounded by a heart on the back instead. This is the 4th example of cards I thought were produced by carrington but did not have the marking but instead had the heart marking. Do you know what company may have made this, or is this possibly an alternative marking for carrington? All 4 examples I have seen looked identical to the carrington cards. Thanks for all your help.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The only logos I am familiar with for Carrington are their famous tree silhouette with a letter inside and the early mark - an 'H' in a circle - seen on some of their oldest cards. I'm not sure who would have been using a heart around 'made in USA', but will keep an eye peeled for any info regarding the mark.

    Best regards,
    Jolene

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thank you very much Jolene.
    With love in your heart,
    every day can be Valentines Day.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Do you have any information on the Louis Katz company?
    They seem to have produced cards in the 1920's and most of what I can find is a few on sale on ebay but not really any other information. Hope all is well.
    Mark

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Mark,

      I have been gathering info regarding Louis Katz for an entry on him. This has not been easy as there were several Louis Katz' in the New York area at the time the cards bearing his name were created. I have several cards to use for an entry. Hopefully, I'll have enough information for at least a small article soon.

      Best Regards,
      Jolene

      Delete
  8. Jolene,
    Thank you for your continued research and dedication to this important part of valentines past. I have around 10 of them and if pictures of them will help, I will be happy to share these with you and everyone that visits your wonderful site.
    Mark
    Mark

    ReplyDelete