Sunday, February 6, 2011

Wooden Shoe Be Mine? Dutch Themes


Valentine Greetings I've got TWO LIPS to share with you ~ Like you? Why of course I do! I just thrive on liking you! I want to tell you so, what's more! That's what Valentines are for!

4 1/2" x 4 1/2" (4 1/2" x 9" opened)
circa 1930s 
 Modified French Fold
 by Carrington
 'C' in tree logo


 Here's my Valentine.

4 3/8" x 4"
circa 1920s
Mechanical Flat
made in Germany

I'd be in DUTCH if I didn't ask you to be my Valentine.

6 1/4" x 7 3/8"
circa 1940s, 1950s
Flat
marked: 776/7
made in USA


Two Lips (Tulips) for you Valentine.

2 7/8" x 3 3/4"
circa 1930s
Flat
Girl in Wooden Shoes with tulips
Part of a series of cards of figures posed in front of a painting set on an artist's easel
marked: made in Germany

For my Valentine ~ Dutch kiddies look cute, but very queer So I prefer those over here For they are just as sweet - and fine As any foreign Valentine.

2 5/8" x 3 7/8" (3 7/8" x 5 1/4" opened)
circa 1920s, 1930s
Single Fold
Pair in Wooden Shoes with Windmill in Background
Girl with doll
marked: made in USA
Carrington ('A' in tree logo)
H (in a circle) 5009

Be My Valentine ~ Though clouded the sky and storm does whine, In my heart shines love for my Valentine.

9" x 7 5/8"
circa early 1900
by Ellen Clapsaddle
The same figures appearing on this die-cut card can be found on postcards
Card has easel stand on the back the bottom of which is seen above under the heart at their feet.

Your DUTCH TREAT Valentine ~ Right hand - Left hand Which do you choose? I'll take both, please ~ Then I won't lose.  From your DUTCH TREAT Valentine.

4 1/4" x 3 1/2"
Made in USA
circa 1930s

single fold

It beats the DUTCH how much I love you!

circa 1930s/1940s
flat

Be My Valentine.

tent-style stand-up
circa 1920s

You can have my TU-LIPS

Figure in wooden shoes and winged cap
flat


Two-Lips for my Valentine.

4 3/8" x 4"
circa 1910s
Mechanical Flat
made in USA

for Sam Gabriel Co

 Two-Lips for my Valentine.

6 1/8" x 3 3/8"
circa 1910s
Mechanical Flat
made in USA

for Sam Gabriel Co

 Lovin' YOU is now a HABIT - Here's my HEART - Why don't you GRAB IT? Be My Valentine.

4 1/2" x 7 7/8"
circa 1960s
Flat
embossed detailing
made in USA
flat



Be My Valentine ~ Vy should you not my luvings take ven I vuz here for luve's sveet sake.

8 1/4" x 3 3/8" flat
circa 1930s
Fold-Out



 WOODEN SHOE like to be my Valentine?

4 3/8" x 4 7/8"
circa 1930s, 1940s
Standing Fold-Out
bottom folds to form stand

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2 comments:

  1. Great Valentines! Love your website. But, I was really wondering WHY there was a Dutch Theme in the 20s, 30's and 40's? Thank you for all the fun Valentines to look at!

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  2. Hello Anonymous -

    Well, that is a good question. And likely a better one asked of a cultural anthropologist than of myself.

    At the time (early to mid 20th century) culturally-themed (and usually very stereotypical) cards and advertisements were common. Astoundingly negative depictions of African Americans, Native American Indians and Asians were mundane. The fascination with all things Dutch was a lot less harsh but still a sense of amusement at how 'weird' those wooden shoes and windmills were, comes through.

    In valentines specifically, the easy punning to be had with tulips and again the wooden shoes probably played a part too. Fads of interest in different specific cultures or subcultures come and go in our American popular culture. Still do, as the more recent interest in Bindis as fashion bling shows.

    I have mixed feelings about this tendency. The interest can be shallow and derisive at times. But having said that, interest across cultures - in trading items, learning new skills, adapting customs or modes of dress, styles of cooking or even new religions - is something humans have been doing forever and can be beneficial, even mutually so if done right. Smarter people than myself have argued that no more than 10% of all the cultural items in any one culture originated from within that specific culture.

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