Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Victorian Standing and Hanging Cards that served as Decorations

No Text.

5 1/2" x 5"
circa 1900s
Hanging Wall Decoration
Woman in Classical Garb
Parchment layer Riveted onto Heavy Card
Unmarked

With Fond Remembrance.

8 3/4" x 5"
circa 1900s
Hanging Wall Decoration
Woman with Daisy
Parchment layer Riveted onto Top Heart
Unmarked

The McLoughlin Brothers, a London-based company (1848-1950) that also had a New York City office, popularized the heavy, sometimes riveted, valentine cards that could be used as home decor.  The layers, attached onto thick backing board, were parchment or celluloid or a mix of the two.  They were often adhered in a way to fold and ruffle or puff out, thus enhancing the 3-d effect created by the layering frequently used in the cards.  

Cupid Ave. Feb. 14th To a Dear Friend - Since time and space Declare I may not meet you send my love and wishes  Thus to greet you.

5 3/4" x 5 3/4"
circa 1900s, 1910s
Standing Display with Easel Stand
Girl in Red Hat

with text inside small envelope (lifts up to open)
Parchment layer Riveted onto Heavy Backing Board
Unmarked

Hanging cards and free-standing ones, those usually with an easel stand attached to the back, could be displayed along side cabinet cards and other knick-knacks of the day. It is common for the ribbons of the hanging style cards to deteriorate while the card itself remains quite intact.

A Gift of Love.

5 1/2" x 5 3/4"
circa 1900s, 1910s
Standing Display with Easel Stand
Text on lower pansies

Unmarked

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